Custer South Dakota Orientation

Bill and I are all settled into our home for the summer in Custer State Park, South Dakota. What a beautiful and magical place. We arrived on May 7th, and on May 9th, we began a very exciting orientation that started in the main Visitor Center, where we will host. This visitor center has a 100 seat theater, where we were saw a movie of the history of Custer State Park. We then spent the morning being introduced to all of the permanent staff, and learned what their responsibilities are, and the seasonal paid workers, and what they do, along with all the other volunteer staff, like us,  that will be working in various areas throughout the park.

When lunchtime rolled around, we were loaded into vans that took us on tours of specific areas within the park so we could get an understanding where things are located within the park. With over 71,000 acres of park land, housing 4 Visitor Centers, there is a lot to learn about how each Visitor Center is different from the others. As Visitor Center Hosts, we will rotate through each of the four Visitor Centers according to our weekly schedules. But before we made a stop at the Visitor Center of the day, we were treated to lunch in one of the many restaurants within the area.

After lunch on day one, we visited the Peter Norbeck Outdoor Education Visitor Center. We will host here as well. This building serves as the base for the majority of the interpretive and educational programs offered within the park, it’s the primary location where visitors can interact with park naturalist and participate in hands-on-activities, learn about wildlife and the plants of the park, and pick up a junior Naturalist booklet. The focus of the center is a kid-friendly adventure to “Discover How to Explore”.

 

 

 

 

There are lots of interactive things to see, touch, open,

and learn about while looking both up and down along your way.

Information like how to make sure you have a backpack that is truly ready to meet your needs out on the trails.

And information on what you might want to look for within the park when you’re out hiking, camping etc.

There are lots of camouflage things on the floor designed to show you how easy it is to miss things if you’re not paying attention. Do you see the snake on the ground?

The outside of the building is another opportunity for children to explore. There is an opening designed to look like what might have been a gold mine. As the kids, or adults, get closer, they can see specks in the rocks that may or may not have been gold…

Our next stop was Badger Hole, another Visitor Center where we will host. This was the home of Charles “Badger” Clark (1883-1957). South Dakota’s first poet laureate. He wrote poems such as A Cowboy’s Prayer, I Must Come Back, and other poems, verse, and short stories that are popular among South Dakotan’s, cowboys, and travelers from all over the world.

 

After Clark’s death on September 26,, 1957, the Badger Hole was acquired by the state from his heirs on the condition that it is maintained as a museum. Everything, his personal belongings, library, clothing, antiques, etc. is to be maintained just as he left them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The next day we took a tour of the wildlife loop in the park. Lots and lots of Bison roaming freely throughout the park.

 

Again, we were treated to lunch at yet another restaurant within the park, and then we toured the Wildlife Station Visitor Center. No pictures of that yet, but stay tuned for more on that later.

At our next stop we visited the Corrals where they bring in all the Bison during the annual Bison roundup at the end of September. Bill and I won’t be here for that because we will be on our way back to Arizona for our winter hosting positions at McDowell Mountain Regional Park.

At the Corrals we learned that all the Bison are rounded up at the end of September every year. This is a huge visitor draw, and lots and lots of people come out to watch the roundup. Cowboys on horseback drive the bison to the holding corrals, and it is all hands on deck to ensure they get weighed, tagged, and the bulls get separated from the cows.

And as needed, they get vaccinated,

and branded with an (S) that identifies them as state Bison.

About 250 Bison are sold at the Bison roundup, the rest are set free to continue to roam freely throughout the park for another year.

It’s all so beautiful and exciting here in Custer State Park. We are impressed with the detailed orientation we are receiving, and that will be followed with on the job training as we rotate through the four different visitor centers throughout the park.

Stay tuned for updates as we learn more about our jobs within each Visitor Center, and as we get out and about to explore all this amazing state has to offer.

 

4 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Becky VanCura
    May 13, 2019 @ 04:18:14

    Boy what an orientation you are having. Will waiting for more. Enjoy

    Reply

    • beyondcinderella
      May 14, 2019 @ 11:23:46

      Yes Becky, we are having a great orientation and starting on the job training today (May 14). You would love it here. They have all the entry stations open from early morning until night to sell entry passes. You need a pass to stop for any reason in the park, even if just to take pictures. Rangers and sheriff patrol the park and ticket any stopped cars without a pass. There are two highways that run through the park and people can travel through without a pass, but you cannot stop to take pictures etc… Hope you’re enjoying your summer experience, and having lots of fun!

      Reply

  2. Robin
    May 14, 2019 @ 12:31:37

    Great to have a few minutes with my morning coffee to get caught up on your adventures! Wow, this place looks HUGE! I’m sure their orientation is totally different that what you all have encountered before. Can’t wait to hear more and loving all the animal pics! xoxo

    Reply

    • beyondcinderella
      May 14, 2019 @ 16:34:10

      Yes, this park is HUGE!!! You really don’t ever need to leave the park because there is so much to see and do here. Several beautiful lakes, fishing, hiking, and wildlife sightseeing galore. We are so excited about all we are seeing and learning. Yes, stay tuned for lots more pictures to come. XoXo

      Reply

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